Checking your phone dozens of times a day indicates unconscious behaviour, which is “extremely repetitive” say psychologists.

A study by Lancaster University and the University of Lincoln is unique in that it is one of a few studies that examined smartphone usage based on what people do rather than what they can remember.

Existing research is yet to conclude whether people really are ‘addicted’ to their smartphones due to over-reliance on people’s own estimates or beliefs.

But new research into smartphone behaviour has revealed that while people underestimate time spent on their smartphones, their behaviour is remarkably consistent, thus enabling a more rigorous approach to the study of smartphone behaviours.

The researchers analysed usage over 13 days using a simple smartphone app which time-stamped when usage began and ended.

From this data, they were able to calculate the number of total hours usage and the number of checks for each day, with a check defined as any usage lasting less than 15 seconds.

They found that:

  • Smartphone usage is repetitive and consistent for each person
  • Future phone checking frequency can be predicted with very little data
  • A standard survey was unable to predict these behaviours

For example, the researchers found that if you check your phone 80 times today, you are likely to repeat this behaviour every day.

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